Don't believe reports about Dennis Schroder's frustration after Raptors Immanuel Quickley trade

Schroder has taken well to his bench role.

Toronto Raptors v Sacramento Kings
Toronto Raptors v Sacramento Kings / Thearon W. Henderson/GettyImages
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The Toronto Raptors' offense has been much better since the acquisition of RJ Barrett and Immanuel Quickley in the OG Anunoby trade. Not only have those two been brilliant individually, but they have displaced Dennis Schroder in the starting lineup to great effect.

While Schroder has been a solid scorer and passer for Toronto in the first season of what is a two-year contract, some fans took issue with his shot selection in close games and the fact his style of play often comes into conflict with the directive to get Scottie Barnes and Pascal Siakam more shots.

Schroder eventually moving to the bench has been a move that has benefitted everyone. The veteran guard gives legitimate scoring pop to one of the more maligned second units in the league, even if he was a bit displeased with the move originally.

While Michael Grange of Sportsnet did admit that Schroder was initially a bit perturbed by his move to the bench after the Quickley addition, social media ran rampant with an out-of-context remark that stated he wanted to lead his own team. In reality, Schroder has adapted to his new role.

Toronto Raptors PG Dennis Schroder has been thriving after moving to bench.

Schroder has been praised by players like Chris Boucher for his tireless work ethic off the bench. “He definitely keeps us focused when he comes into the game,” Boucher said. "He communicates a lot on the floor, so it helps us a lot on the bench with the switches and just being in the right spot.”

Schroder has averaged 14.8 points and 5.0 assists per game while making 56% of his shots in his four games off the bench. Having fought for Sixth Man of the Year awards in the past, Schroder has a history of excelling in this type of role.

After it seemed like Rajakovic was mixing and matching the bench lineups every other night, Schroder's move brought clarity to the team. Everyone knows their role. Schroder can be a ball-dominant point guard and Gary Trent Jr. is instant offense from deep. Boucher is a high-energy power forward, and Jontay Porter adds size and interior defense.

Schroder, who said he wanted to remain in Toronto long-term just a few days ago, made the right decision by accepting his move to the bench and thriving in his role. If this keeps up, Toronto's brand-new offense might be skilled enough to keep the victories piling up.

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